Fiona Frazer, Chief Human right United Nations assistance Mission in Afghanistan, speaks during a press conference in Kabul on July 20, 2022. – (Photo by Wakil KOHSAR / AFP) (Photo by WAKIL KOHSAR/AFP via Getty Images)

KABUL, Afghanistan – United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) Chief of Human Rights Fiona Frazer, in an interview with TOLOnews Friday, said they bid to interact with the Islamic Emirate government to reopen girls’ school in Afghanistan.

This came days after (UNAMA) released a report, outlining the human rights situation in Afghanistan since the Taliban takeover last August, including ban on high school girl’s education in the country.

“I think that we need to continue to keep raising what we see as concerns on the ground and to keep interacting and engaging with the de facto authorities…” she said, as TOLOnews quoted.

Frazer believes the restrictions against girls’ high schools in Afghanistan is an obstacle to the country’s development, saying such a leadership of the Taliban interrupts a generation of girl’s basic learning and schooling.

“We do have the fact that girls are no longer able throughout Afghanistan to go to secondary school,” she said. “One of the points that we make related to this is that it is really interrupting a generation of girls’ basic education.”

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Since the takeover last August, Taliban government has been imposing strict restrictions against women rights and girls’ education in Afghanistan, which has sparked global reactions.

Earlier, the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) released a report, outlining the human rights situation in Afghanistan since the Taliban takeover last August.

The report summarizes UNAMA’s findings with regards to the protection of civilians, extrajudicial killings, torture and ill-treatment, arbitrary arrests and detentions, the rights of women and girls in Afghanistan, fundamental freedoms and the situation in places of detention.

Despite a significant reduction in armed conflict, UNAMA recorded 2106 civilian casualties between mid-August 2021 and mid-June 2022. The majority of civilian casualties were attributed to targeted attacks by the ISIL against ethnic and religious minority communities.

“It is beyond time for all Afghans to be able to live in peace and rebuild their lives after 20 years of armed conflict,” said Markus Potzel, Acting Secretary-General’s Special Representative for Afghanistan. “Our monitoring reveals that despite the improved security situation since 15 August, the people of Afghanistan, in particular women and girls, are deprived of the full enjoyment of their human rights.”

While the Taliban leadership have taken some steps seemingly aimed at the protection and promotion of human rights, including amnesty for former government officials and security force members, they bear responsibility for a broad range of human rights violations, according to the findings.

The erosion of women’s rights has been one of the most notable aspects of the de facto administration, where women and girls have particularly been restricted from obtaining education and living a normal public life in the country.

“The education and participation of women and girls in public life is fundamental to any modern society. The relegation of women and girls to the home denies Afghanistan the benefit of the significant contributions they have to offer. Education for all is not only a basic human right, it is the key to progress and development of a nation,” said the UN envoy.

But the Islamic Emirate spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid, defying the latest findings by the UNAMA, said the report is “inaccurate” and there are no extrajudicial killings, as TOLOnews reported. If anyone commits such, they will be punished based on Sharia law, calling the report a “propaganda.”

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