The Taliban government’s Ministry of Education officials say that the decision to close girls’ schools above the sixth grade nationwide is only “temporary”, not “permanent”, and that the group is working on a plan to resume the schools.

According to the spokesman for the ministry of education, Aziz Ahmad Rayan, who spoke at a press conference on Tuesday, August 16, whenever the Taliban leadership council and the religious scholars decide to permit schools to reopen for girls, the guidelines and standards will be put in place, and the issue will be resolved.

The Ministry of Education has put in adequate effort in this area, but certain processes take years to complete, and the problem with schools is not one that can be resolved quickly, according to a spokesperson for the ministry.

“Afghanistan is a cultural country with a variety of issues. This is not the place to delve into them in depth,” he further added.

The Taliban official continued by saying that while the media presents the issue of middle school and high school girls’ education against the Taliban government, the reopening of schools above the sixth grade calls for the appropriate answer, the right mechanism, as well as the right amount of time, effort, and mentalization.

According to Ministry of Education officials, Afghanistan has 17,780 schools, 15,083 of which are public and 2,697 private, educating a total of 10 million students, 6 million of whom are boys and 4 million of whom are girls.

While the Taliban’s commitment to reopening schools for girls, Afghan girls are still denied access to education from the sixth grade and above after the group retook control of the country in August of last year.

Author

  • Saqalain Eqbal is an Online Editor for Khaama Press. He is a Law graduate from The American University of Afghanistan (AUAF).