UntitledA set of photographs have gone viral on social media websites in Afghanistan which shows a young lady walking in the streets of Kabul city with bare legs.

The young woman was reportedly spotted in Karte-3 area in the western part of Kabul city but there are no reports regarding the exact date and time the photographs were taken.

The photographs were widely shared on social media, specifically on Facebook which have created confusions among the users of social media.

There have been mix reactions towards the photographs where certain people have said that the young lady has intentionally walked in the streets with bare legs, accusing her of prostitution.

While certain others have said she was not psychologically in a normal condition and was perhaps looking for someone anxiously.

However, the photographs shows the woman was not only walking with bare legs but she is not wearing any footwear either.

Women walking with bare legs or wearing miniskirts was common in Kabul during the late 1960’s where the country had seen relatively steady progression for women’s rights by making significant strides in its efforts to modernize and construct a civilian democracy

The women were first eligible to vote in 1920’s – only a year after women in the UK were given voting rights, and a year before the women in the United States were allowed to vote.

However, the certain restrictions were implemented on women following the collapse of Soviet occupation and the Najibullah regime where women had to wear the head-scarf or hijab and were refused to attend the UN’s fourth world conference on women in Beijing in 1995.

Further restrictions were implemented on women during the Taliban regime from 1996 to 2001 where women were forced to fully cover themselves in veils and were prohibited to work or attend school or educational institutes.

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  • Khaama Press

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