Khaama Press (KP) | Afghan News Agency » Education http://www.khaama.com The largest news and information source in Afghanistan Mon, 21 Apr 2014 12:24:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9 The Best Ways to Encourage Young Entrepreneurs http://www.khaama.com/the-best-ways-to-encourage-young-entrepreneurs-154 http://www.khaama.com/the-best-ways-to-encourage-young-entrepreneurs-154#comments Tue, 11 Dec 2012 06:40:50 +0000 http://www.khaama.com/?p=21139 The Best Ways to Encourage Young Entrepreneurs
Building stable economies may seem to depend most on finances, but innovation and small-scale business growth is also usually essential. Khaama Press (KP) has highlighted this dichotomy a number of times in recent months, but the conversation gets a new spin in the next article. American writer Emma Collins looks at how business education can Read the full article...]]>
The Best Ways to Encourage Young Entrepreneurs

Building stable economies may seem to depend most on finances, but innovation and small-scale business growth is also usually essential. Khaama Press (KP) has highlighted this dichotomy a number of times in recent months, but the conversation gets a new spin in the next article. American writer Emma Collins looks at how business education can help spur growth in societies all over the world. Ms. Collins is a higher education expert, and has previously compiled such things as MBA Online’s School Rankings Report 2012.

How Developing MBA Skills Early Encourages Entrepreneurship and Economic Recovery

Historically, big business has maintained firm control over the corporate world – but today, the impact of startup companies is just as significant. For this reason, many educational experts argue that entrepreneurial skills should be taught to today’s students.

According to a 2009 survey by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, most Americans believe that the private sector holds the key to full economic recovery. Out of more than 2,000 respondents, the majority felt that the U.S. government should encourage more entrepreneurs to launch companies and increase job growth. Sixty-three percent support long-term business creation policies, while 79 percent argue that entrepreneurial ventures are fundamental to improving nationwide employment rates. Furthermore, most respondents were not in favor of the stimulus package put forth by the Obama Administration. Barely one-fifth felt that this form of government spending would actually support entrepreneurs, while the majority believed the stimulus would hinder such activities. A 2010 report by Kauffman bolstered the survey, noting that new companies generate 3 million jobs within their first year – and meanwhile, older, more established firms lose 1 million jobs on an annual basis.

As startup companies have proven invaluable to economic recovery, many academic experts have begun to note the components that are crucial to successful entrepreneurship. During a lecture at Stanford University, GO Corp. Founder Jerry Kaplan noted the “five critical skills that entrepreneurs need.” The first, he said, is leadership; strong managers are required to navigate companies during periods of uncertainty or financial loss. Entrepreneurs should also foster a sense of communication and teamwork throughout their company in order to increase efficiency and solve problems quickly. Since company management involves a great deal of decision-making, Kaplan noted that knowing when to make each decision is important; acting prematurely or too late can have an equally detrimental impact on the company’s operations. Finally, he noted that attention to detail, or “telescoping,” is crucial because focusing on smaller components allows entrepreneurs to “see the big picture.”

Today, entrepreneurial education is a hot trend at many of America’s most prominent academic institutions. In a Wall Street Journal article titled “Can Entrepreneurship Be Taught?” Harvard Business School professor Noam Wasserman wrote that teaching entrepreneurial skills is no different from engineering, medicine or any other subject. The key to successful entrepreneurial education, he argued, is supplementing case studies and anecdotal evidence with algorithms and mathematical analysis – “Moneyball for Founders,” as he calls it. However, some critics have argued that not everyone is naturally qualified to become a successful entrepreneur. In the same article, author Victor W. Hwang noted that entrepreneurs should learn their trade in the real world, not in a classroom. While academic business management effectively teaches students about quantifiable subjects like risk calculation and financial analysis, college-level programs are unable to show them how to experiment, collaborate, and lead a company.

Others believe that, while entrepreneurship can in fact be taught, the current educational climate does not foster a high level of appreciation for business creation. During a recent TED talk, “entrepreneurial coach” Cameron Herold argued that public education has historically encouraged children to pursue “traditional” career paths – and as a result, students with natural entrepreneurial skills are often overlooked. “If we can teach our kids to become entrepreneurial … we could actually have all these kids spreading businesses instead of waiting for government handouts,” he said. “Our MBA programs don’t teach kids to be entrepreneurs. They teach them to go work in corporations, but who is starting these companies?”

A recent article by Inc. explored some effective steps teachers and parents can take to foster entrepreneurship among today’s young people. By urging children to set goals for assignments and exams and recognize both problems and opportunities, adult figures are essentially encouraging them to approach everyday situations as an entrepreneur would. The article also notes some constructive approaches to failure. Rather than punishing students for low grades or poor test scores, adults should discuss the situation with them in-depth and explore some of the reasons behind the results. The article echoes Mr. Kaplan by urging adults to teach children the merits of effective communication, leadership, and teamwork. Finally, children should learn the intrinsic value of giving back, not only to their peers but also the community at large. “It is important for your children to develop the characteristic of helping others,” the author notes. “This attribute will allow your children to stay humble during periods of great success and it will give them the insight that a successful business provides benefits to more than just it’s owner.”

In the last decade, startup companies have greatly impacted the business world by creating jobs, launching innovative products, and proving that companies do not require a large workforce in order to be successful. Entrepreneurship may not be a “traditional” career path, but today’s educators – and parents – should promote business creation among children in order to benefit the American economy in years to come.

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The Changing Demographics of Higher Education From Community College to Masters Degree http://www.khaama.com/the-changing-demographics-of-higher-education-745 http://www.khaama.com/the-changing-demographics-of-higher-education-745#comments Wed, 10 Oct 2012 06:06:20 +0000 http://www.khaama.com/?p=19467 The Changing Demographics of Higher Education From Community College to Masters Degree
Khaama Press has featured several articles on the growing number of Afghan students receiving college degrees in recent years, but what not all readers may know is that the trend of heightened enrollments is something of a worldwide phenomenon. Today’s post by Rachel Higgins takes a close look at higher education statistics in the United Read the full article...]]>
The Changing Demographics of Higher Education From Community College to Masters Degree

Khaama Press has featured several articles on the growing number of Afghan students receiving college degrees in recent years, but what not all readers may know is that the trend of heightened enrollments is something of a worldwide phenomenon. Today’s post by Rachel Higgins takes a close look at higher education statistics in the United States. Ms. Higgins writes for AccreditedOnlineColleges.com, a website that tracks developments in student learning over the Internet.

The Changing Demographics of Higher Education From Community College to Masters Degree Programs

While college enrollment has been increasing for some time, it has hit an all-time high over the past year or so. Recent data from the National Center for Education Statistics shows that from 2000 to 2010, university enrollment increased 37%, from 15.3 million to 21.0 million, with much of the percentage increase coming from students aged 25 years and older. Thanks in part to the rapidly increasing diversity of education options, the status quo in higher education is changing quickly. Yet, for some underrepresented minorities, university enrollment can still seem out of reach.

In the US, the recent economic downturn has influenced notable spikes in higher education enrollment. There were 46,030 applications at the University of Southern California for the 2012 school year, for instance, and more than 36,400 of them were rejected. Furthermore, many Ivy League schools have let it be known that their acceptance rates are currently lower than 8%. Yet, as the US economy suffers, economic development in other areas is spurring university enrollment as well. A report by the group Education at a Glance has found that the number of individuals enrolling in education beyond compulsory schooling has grown to rapidly around the world in recent years. On average, growth in secondary education enrollment has held at an average of 4.5% each year from 1998 to 2009, and by 7% or more in Ireland, Poland, Portugal, Spain and Turkey. In countries such as Canada, Japan, Korea and Russia, over 50% of youths have enrolled in education beyond mandatory grade school.

The growth of college enrollment in recent years has lead to a dramatic evolution of the idea of an “average” college student. In a 2002 National Center for Education Statistics report, nontraditional students were found to make up 73% of all students enrolled in undergraduate programs, and 39% of all undergraduate students are 25 years or older. In the report, the term “nontraditional students” could refer to those who work full time, have children or dependents other than a spouse, or have earned a GED instead of a diploma, among other identifiers.

One group that is as yet underrepresented in university enrollment is the US Hispanic immigrant population. Despite rapidly growing birth rates and rising college enrollment, Hispanics are still not graduating from high school or going on to college at the same rate as white and African American students. Educators cite issues like economic disparity, the quality of college preparation at urban schools with high Hispanic populations, and a sense of isolation among those who are the first in their families to graduate from college. Some experts also recommend that universities acknowledge nontraditional students within their organization’s mission statement, in hopes that this would foster a more welcoming atmosphere for nontraditional, low income and immigrant students.

For many, one of the most cherished aspects of higher education remains the opportunity to connect with individuals from all walks of life and expanding one’s cultural awareness. While college demographics have changed substantially in recent years, they have yet to truly reflect the demographics of the US and world population at large. By focusing on nontraditional students, colleges can open up new opportunities that build enrollment at large while enhancing the educational experience for all students.

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