Tuesday, March 5, 2024

Afghan women decry unequal humanitarian aid distribution over year-long gap

Immigration News

Fidel Rahmati
Fidel Rahmatihttps://www.khaama.com
Fidai Rahmati is the editor and content writer for Khaama Press. You may follow him at Twitter @FidelRahmati

The United Nations Coordination Office (OCHA) recently published a report indicating that one million women and girls in Afghanistan have been deprived of humanitarian assistance.

Qudsia, a woman renting in Kabul, said, “We received help several times almost two years ago, but since then, we have not received any assistance.”

OCHA’s report, released on September 4th, highlights that one million women and 700,000 children have been deprived of humanitarian aid in 2023 due to funding shortages.

Meanwhile, some women in Afghanistan, left empty-handed, describe the unequal distribution of humanitarian aid and claim they have not received any help for over a year.

Several of these women, speaking with Khaama Press News Agency, reveal they are facing significant economic hardships and have not received any assistance for over a year.

Qudsia, a Kabul resident, added, “We received help several times almost two years ago, but since then, we have not received any assistance.”

She has five children, and her husband is unemployed. Two of their children are also ill, and she cannot afford their treatment. She emphasizes the unfair distribution of aid in Afghanistan and urges humanitarian organizations to address the needs of the Afghan people.

However, a United Nations investigation shows that after the Taliban’s ban on women working, 86% of domestic and international NGO activities have been halted or severely reduced.

The United Nations Women’s Division had previously announced that out of 151 active NGOs in Afghanistan, 86% of organizations managed by women or focused on providing services to women had suspended or greatly limited their activities in response to the Taliban’s decision to prohibit women from working in non-governmental organizations.

Sahar is a mother of five and lives in the Kishima district of Badakhshan province. She told Khaama Press News Agency that her husband is addicted, and she is the sole provider for her family.

According to Sahar, she used to receive food aid from relief organizations like the World Food Program, but recently, she has not received any assistance. This lack of assistance comes when she knows her family’s livelihood depends on it.

After the ban on women working in non-governmental organizations, the United Nations named the Taliban’s action unjust. They emphasized that this restriction is hitting the women who rely on assistance the hardest, especially in remote areas.

Riza Gul is another needy woman who sells items on the streets of Kabul and relies on humanitarian aid. She says that she has not received any assistance in the past year. She also complains about the distribution process and finds it opaque.

Riza Gul says, “Sometimes aid comes to our area, but we have no intermediary to help us.”

The increase in people’s needs and the unemployment of all women in Afghanistan are direct consequences of the Taliban’s rule. Women’s rights activists believe that the interim administration’s efforts to exclude women from the workforce and intentionally remove them from social spheres have increased women’s dependency on humanitarian aid.

Maryam Sediqi, a journalist and women’s rights activist said to Khaama Press News Agency, “Women have been removed from all sectors, and a significant portion of them are the breadwinners of their families. They are not allowed to work, which increases their reliance on humanitarian aid.”

According to her, the activities of relief organizations, even with male staff only, are another factor that deprives needy women of humanitarian assistance: “After September 2022, these relief organizations continue their activities with male personnel, which means the needs that were previously identified by female staff in these organizations have been paralyzed.”

The woman renting in Kabul said, “We received help several times almost two years ago, but since then, we have not received any assistance.”

OCHA’s report, released on September 4th, highlights that one million women and 700,000 children have been deprived of humanitarian aid in 2023 due to funding shortages.

Meanwhile, some women in Afghanistan, left empty-handed, describe the unequal distribution of humanitarian aid and claim they have not received any help for over a year.

Several of these women, speaking with Khaama Press News Agency, reveal they are facing significant economic hardships and have not received any assistance for over a year.

Qudsia, a Kabul resident, added, “We received help several times almost two years ago, but since then, we have not received any assistance.”

She has five children, and her husband is unemployed. Two of their children are also ill, and she cannot afford their treatment. She emphasizes the unfair distribution of aid in Afghanistan and urges humanitarian organizations to address the needs of the Afghan people.

However, a United Nations investigation shows that after the Taliban’s ban on women working, 86% of domestic and international NGO activities have been halted or severely reduced.

The United Nations Women’s Division had previously announced that out of 151 active NGOs in Afghanistan, 86% of organizations managed by women or focused on providing services to women had suspended or greatly limited their activities in response to the Taliban’s decision to prohibit women from working in non-governmental organizations.

Sahar is a mother of five and lives in the Kishima district of Badakhshan province. She told Khaama Press News Agency that her husband is addicted, and she is the sole provider for her family.

According to Sahar, she used to receive food aid from relief organizations like the World Food Program, but recently, she has not received any assistance. This lack of assistance comes when she knows her family’s livelihood depends on it.

After the ban on women working in non-governmental organizations, the United Nations named the Taliban’s action unjust. They emphasized that this restriction is hitting the women who rely on assistance the hardest, especially in remote areas.

Riza Gul is another needy woman who sells items on the streets of Kabul and relies on humanitarian aid. She says that she has not received any assistance in the past year. She also complains about the distribution process and finds it opaque.

Riza Gul says, “Sometimes aid comes to our area, but we have no intermediary to help us.”

The increase in people’s needs and the unemployment of all women in Afghanistan are direct consequences of the Taliban’s rule. Women’s rights activists believe that the interim administration’s efforts to exclude women from the workforce and intentionally remove them from social spheres have increased women’s dependency on humanitarian aid.

Maryam Sediqi, a journalist and women’s rights activist said to Khaama Press News Agency, “Women have been removed from all sectors, and a significant portion of them are the breadwinners of their families. They are not allowed to work, which increases their reliance on humanitarian aid.”

According to her, the activities of relief organizations, even with male staff only, are another factor that deprives needy women of humanitarian assistance: “After September 2022, these relief organizations continue their activities with male personnel, which means the needs that were previously identified by female staff in these organizations have been paralyzed.”

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