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4.5 Million Killed By War Since 9/11, New Study Finds

Immigration News

Fidel Rahmati
Fidel Rahmatihttps://www.khaama.com
Fidai Rahmati is the editor and content writer for Khaama Press. You may follow him at Twitter @FidelRahmati

The study says that wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Syria, Yemen, Libya and Somalia directly killed at least 1 million people.

The Cost of War Project released its staggering figures on Monday, covering the 20 years after 9/11.

According to a new study from Brown University in Rhode Island, more than 4.5 million people have been killed in wars since the terrorist attacks on the US on September 11, 2001, and the number is still growing.

Additionally, 3.5 million (between 3,588,000 and 3,716,000) people died indirectly as a result of the war due to things like failed economies, extreme poverty, starvation, and the spread of diseases like cholera and measles.

The US was expressly mentioned for its role in several international wars after 9/11, particularly the losses during the past 20 years in Afghanistan, even if the project has not blamed any country specifically.

“Though in 2021 the United States withdrew military forces from Afghanistan, officially ending a war that began with its invasion 20 years prior, today Afghans are suffering and dying from war-related causes at higher rates than ever,” the research said.

Additionally, the project urged governments worldwide, including the US, to take responsibility for repairing the damage caused by these wars.

In the meantime, the US invaded Iraq in 2003 after intervening in Afghanistan and conducting more military operations against countries in the Middle East. 

Other incidents involve attacks on Pakistani, Somalian, and Yemeni targets and those in Libya and Syria that are not directly related to the so-called “war on terror.”

Meanwhile, millions of people have left their homes and immigrated to other countries due to the direct and indirect consequences of the war and being in a devastating situation.

The study suggests compensation though not easy or cheap, “Reparations, though not easy or cheap, are imperative.”

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